BMW 740i Design Pure Excellence Review

Offering an imposing presence and increased dimensions is the new BMW flagship sedan. Ian McLaren sampled the more affordable 740i Design Pure Excellence derivative on the roads around California.  The post BMW 740i Design Pure Excellence Review appeared first on CAR Magazine.

BMW 740i Design Pure Excellence Review

Offering an imposing presence and increased dimensions is the new BMW flagship sedan. Ian McLaren sampled the more affordable 740i Design Pure Excellence derivative on the roads around California. 

740i

Image: BMW

The fact that the average age of a BMW 7 Series owner in China is just thirty-eight is significant. Apart from highlighting the rate at which this flourishing market is managing to create wealth within its population, that more than 45% of annual 7 Series sales is currently focused within this country’s borders broadly explains this German brand’s thinking around the positioning of its flagship proposition. While the X7 SUV has quickly established itself as the favoured premium BMW product within the still important US market, the need to appease an emerging, younger and distinctly more flamboyant 7 Series sedan audience than historically acknowledged has resulted in any number of difficult decisions being made at board level in Munich. This included sign-off on the expanded dimensions of the 7 sedan, but also approval for the horizontally split headlamp units confirmed to distinguish the brand’s flagship family of vehicles, going forward.

Related: How has the flagship BMW saloon gotten to this point – 7 Series evolution

Now available exclusively in long-wheelbase form, the new 7 Series has grown by 130 mm in overall length (to 5 391 mm), by 45 mm in width and 51 mm in height compared with the LWB G11 model is replaces. Including a subtle stretch in wheelbase length for added presence, the car’s party piece is its massive signature grille and novel headlamp design. In everyday driving conditions the 7 is distinguishable via piercing LED driving lights that occupy the top tier of this new lighting layout. All but hidden from view until illuminated, the main beams are instead sunken into the car’s bold new frontage. In South Africa, customers have the choice between the standard fitment Design Pure Excellence exterior package or an M Sport or M Sport Pro upgrade.

Image: BMW

While those larger overall dimensions correspond with improved levels of spaciousness and comfort for all, BMW is quick to point out that historically a majority portion of 7 Series owners favour driving themselves over being chauffeured. That statistic may well change in the new 7, though, as over-and-above the predictable levels of luxurious accommodation available in this car’s rear passenger compartment, highlights include tablet-type functions touchpads incorporated within the door handles and the option to include a 31,3-inch, 8K cinema screen that deploys from the roof and is capable of streaming everything from Netflix to YouTube. A Bower and Wilkens audio system completes this impressively opulent setup.

With all four doors operated electrically – either individually or in unison for dramatic effect – via push button, the cabin of the seventh generation 7 Series gains both the brand’s newest curved infotainment display, fully digital instrumentation and fluid current operating system. With both attention to detail and perceived build quality at its segment-leading best, adopted from the iX is BMW’s My Modes setup. Replacing the traditional driving modes arrangement (Eco, Normal and Sport), this voice- and touch-activated system affords an owner the opportunity to select between several predefined “mood” configurations. As an example, the Relax setting places the car’s drivetrain and standard adaptive air suspension into their most forgiving settings, respectively, but it also activates the seat massage function and closes all rear window blinds. A standard ambient lighting arrangement is showcased via a sleek Interaction Bar running the width of the facia and appropriately adjusts its colour to match the prevailing scene.

Built on an all-new architecture, each derivative in the modern 7 Series portfolio includes a level of electrification within its respective drivetrain. Available in South Africa, both the 740i sDrive and 740d xDrive feature a 48 V, mild hybrid arrangement able to both seamlessly supplement the working of each car’s internal combustion engine, as well as integrate within the vehicle’s myriad electrical systems. As an example, the hybrid system mated with the 740i’s 3,0-litre straight-six turbopetrol engine can add up to 200 N.m of instantly available torque, from standstill.

Image: BMW

Fitted with a ZF-sourced eight-speed automatic transmission, both the 740i and the 220 kW/670 N.m 740d xDrive (all-wheel drive) offer compelling respective arguments against the inevitable demise of the combustion engine. While the imposing new dimensions and, indeed, newfound sense of presence afforded to the new 7 Series felt right at home cruising the motorways and suburbs around our California-based launch location, expect the profile of BMW’s latest flagship offering to dominate the whatever South African setting that it arrives in – as is a modern 7 Series owner’s want.

BMW 740i Design Pure Excellence Fast Facts

  • Price: R2 172 751
  • Engine: front-mounted, turbopetrol, 2 998cc, inline-six
  • Transmission: eight-speed auto
  • Power: 280 kW @ 5200 – 6250 rpm
  • Torque: 540 N.m @ 1850 – 5000 rpm
  • Driven wheels: Rear
  • 0-100 km/h: 5,4 seconds
  • Top speed: 250 km/h
  • Fuel consumption: 8,1 L/100km (combined)
  • CO2 emissions: 182 g/km
  • Rivals: Mercedes-Benz S-Class; Audi A8

The post BMW 740i Design Pure Excellence Review appeared first on CAR Magazine.


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